Breakfast Roundtables

Breakfast Roundtables

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Welcome to CASE District I! A Breakfast Roundtable for First-time Conference Attendees

Table 1: Future of Data-driven Fundraising: Does Behavior trump Capacity?

Track: Advancement Services

Marketing automation and machine learning technology are being successfully deployed by the for-profit sector around the globe.

Until only recently, modeling was done in a bubble, using historical (or purchased) data exclusively. Today, charities have access to a wealth of real-time behavioral data that can be used to build stronger relationships at a greater scale.

In this presentation, Dr. Greg Lee and Fundmetric CEO, Mark Hobbs will explore how this technology will impact the non-profit sector and what you can do today to get ready for the transformational impact it will have on how you build relationships.

Speakers:

Mark Hobbs
CEO, Fundmetric

Mark has experienced first-hand the struggles that non-profits face fundraising. His advertising agency developed materials for countless non-profit causes and his focus on metrics has helped him craft more effective fundraising materials. Understanding these challenges allows him to develop and sell a product that is built by fundraisers for fundraisers.

Greg Lee
Data Scientist, Fundmetric

Greg holds a Ph.D. in Artificial Intelligence from the University of Alberta. His thesis work focused on using machine learning to automatically select relevant stories for sports commentary. Greg is now focusing his machine learning and information retrieval expertise on data-driven story-telling and data-driven decision making to produce the ultimate targeted campaigns for charities.

ErikaCole
 ecole@fundmetric.com

Table 2: Philanthropy Is Not About Money, It’s About Leadership

Track: Alumni Relations

Volunteer leaders provide critical assistance to non-profit organizations by advancing important initiatives that have enormous positive impact in our society.  With their deep commitment and connectivity, volunteer leaders attract additional leaders and donors creating the momentum needed to rapidly raise awareness and support for key initiatives.

Private philanthropy is important because it invigorates the mission of the institution by connecting the donor more personally with the institution.  When a donor sees their passions put into action this further inspires the donor and also deepens the impact of the project being supported. Yes, these donors give substantially, more importantly, as leaders they generate and leverage exponential possibilities through their connections.

By knowing their passions, and connecting with an institution to put their passions into action, volunteer leaders are taking a bold step in their self-discovery.

Institutions can also make a greater impact by embracing strong collaborations with volunteer leaders.

How do we involve more people as volunteer leaders?

  • By helping volunteers expand the self-perception of themselves and redefining how they embrace the significance of giving.  Deciding not to just give, instead, choosing to be a leader on an important issue.  Being a volunteer leader means being actively involved as a partner, being an advocate, and bringing along others to join you.  Most importantly, being truly invested and committed to a passion.  In making this commitment, we are discovering or revealing something about ourselves.  It can be risky to take a stand, but the rewards of truly connecting with your passion and taking action enables one to express their true self and live a bolder life.
  • Volunteer leaders change the world and change other people’s lives. What they often don’t realize is that they are changing themselves too. In this current moment that we are living in, it is important to participate, to connect, and to remove the siloes from our thinking, to be able to collaborate and benefit from the ideas from one another.
  • Working with exceptional philanthropic leaders has inspired me. My own recognition about the importance of connectivity has transformed over the years, particularly while working with a new community of exceptional individuals during my brother’s six-month battle with cancer.  The community of doctors, nurses and staff became an extension of our family. It was only through drawing on my deep belief and understanding of the importance of connectivity that I was able to welcome this new community into our lives, which helped all of us persevere.
  • Our work as Advancement Professionals is so important because it presents an opportunity to foster connections in communities we care deeply about.  It is incredibly inspiring to work with individuals who previously had little or no connection to an organization and to witness the connections grow and the outcomes that result. Beyond the important funding that changes lives, volunteer leaders help transform the world in which we live.

Speakers:

Marcy Potter
Senior Director of Development, UCLA

Marcy Potter lives in San Francisco and currently manages the Northern CA and Pacific NW Regions for UCLA External Affairs. An optimist and connector, she has a love of meeting people and helping them envision how their leadership can make a difference in the world. Marcy has 20 years of successful fundraising experience in campaign management, major gifts and volunteer leadership development.

Speakers:

Marcelyn Potter
mpotter@support.ucla.edu

Table 3: Alumni Engagement Metrics: Imagined and Real

Track: Alumni Relations

Join this roundtable to discuss how practitioners plan on using the four engagement categories identified by the CASE taskforce on alumni metrics (Volunteer, Experiential, Philanthropic and Communication).  Bring your suggestions.  Then, learn the steps Boston College has taken in creating an engagement metrics platform from the ground up.

Speakers:

Meagan Flint
Associate Director, Alumni Affinity Programs, Boston College
meagan.flint@bc.edu

Scott Atwell
Senior Vice President, Grenzebach Glier and Associates

Table 4: Young Alumni Engagement

Track: Alumni Relations

Speakers:

Adam Steinberg
Vice President, Graham-Pelton

Table 7: Meetup of Diverse Professionals in Advancement; Finding and Supporting Each Other

Track: Diversity and Inclusion

Tell us who you are, share your story and network. This is a meeting to share plans and build momentum for a regional Spring gathering of diverse candidates.

Speakers:

Neida Jimenez
Senior Leadership Giving Officer, Harvard Business School

Development professional with over 10 years of experience working at Harvard University. Graduate from Rutgers University.

Neida Jimenez
njimenez@hbs.edu

Table 9: How to Run a Successful Graduating Class Gift Campaign?

Track: Development

2018 was a terrific year for the Harvard Kennedy School Annual Fund!

We surpassed the participation goal for alumni giving and we also ran the most successful and record-setting Graduating Class Gift Campaign for the past ten fiscal years. We raised our students’ giving from 23% participation in the class and $4,050 in 2017 to 52% participation and $21, 250 in 2018!

In times when the value of higher education is being questioned and students are dealing with high amounts of debt, how do we inspire and educate them so they give back to their alma mater?
We did a lot and we did it differently – from recruiting the right student volunteers to incorporating an educational component to the Campaign, to organizing fun student events on campus and all this on a small budget and with 1 1/2 team members.

This session aims to share our key take-aways and how-tos and help other teams rethink their current approach to Graduating Class Gift Campaigns and to engaging current students and recent graduates. We would be interested in facilitating a discussion on what other graduate schools are doing and how they are keeping the excitement, participation and giving up.

Speakers:

Zheni Valcheva
HKS Fund Officer, Harvard Kennedy School
zheni_valcheva@hks.harvard.edu

I have worked in both major gifts and annual giving in the Office of Alumni Relations and Resource Development at Harvard Kennedy School.  I have proven track record of meeting and exceeding goals and delivering results in a timely and professional manner.  I am a team player who inspires others to achieve great results for the organization. In my current role, I cultivate and solicit leadership-level annual gifts, work successfully with alumni and student volunteers. I also help manage the mail and email appeal programs for the HKS Fund. Collaborating closely with the HKS Fund Senior Director I coordinate the stewardship, acknowledgements, and donor recognition programs for the Fund.

Table 10: How to Approach Funders? (Including those who are not accepting applications)

Track: Development

Key outline:
• Open RFPs are only a small portion of the opportunities out there
• Successful fundraising starts at with finding the best match prospects and building relationships
o Tap into the data and insights from Foundation Directory Online to build robust prospect lists
o Leverage FDO’s LinkedIn integration to build your relationship with prospects
• Get the insider hints and tips from the Foundation Center’s own development team

Speakers:

Dorothy Ho
Marketing Manager, Foundation Center
dho@foundationcenter.org

Tracy Waksler
Director of Subscription Products, Foundation Center

As Director of Subscription Products, Tracy oversees sales, marketing and customer engagement. She also sphere-heads the strategic direction of subscription products roadmap. Her experience includes leading product management at companies such as Yodle and Rovi. As well as, leading sales and marketing teams at Rounder Records.  Tracy holds a B.A. in economics from Smith College. A longstanding volunteer with God’s Love We Deliver and previously a Guest Lecturer at Rutgers University.

Table 11: Planned Giving by Phone?  How telephone outreach can have a long-term impact on your planned giving program!

Track: Development

This session will explore current statistics and trends in planned giving and look at new ways to enhance your organization’s planned giving efforts.  Discover new techniques for identifying planned giving prospects, soliciting potential donors, and closing the gift over the phone. Learn how to make the ask using the mass communication instruments of mail, e-mail and telephone solicitation. This session will also provide strategy on the selection of donors for a planned giving direct marketing campaign.

Most planned giving donors say “they were simply never asked” for a gift. Learn how your organization can avoid this common pitfall and develop a thriving and profitable planned giving marketing and solicitation plan.

Speakers:

Anthony Alonso
President, Catapult Fundraising, Inc.

Anthony Alonso, President of Catapult Fundraising, Inc., has over 25 years of experience in direct marketing. His experience ranges in the education, health care, social services and arts markets. Mr. Alonso has had the honor of working with prestigious institutions, including the U.S. Naval Academy Foundation, the U.S. Military Academy Association of Graduates, The Betty Ford Center, The Hill School and countless Catholic organizations. Mr. Alonso served three terms on the AFP Foundation Board, was a founding member of the AFP Industry Partners Council and has served as an officer of the N.J. Chapter board of AFP. He has provided pro-bono calling services to a myriad of organizations, including the AFP Foundation for Philanthropy. It is Mr. Alonso’s expertise that has led his clients to successfully raise over $250 million within the last five years from the lower end of the donor pyramid.

Karen Molnar
karenm@catapultfr.com

Table 12: Getting Campaign Ready Around the World

Track: Development

As McGill University prepares for its bicentennial celebration in 2021, and gets ready for its corresponding campaign, it has no choice but to look outside of Montreal, Quebec and even Canada. As Canada’s most international university, more than half of McGill’s alumni are living outside of the city. To set ourselves up for campaign success, McGill has been proactive about activating support at all levels from around the world. From Australia to Paris and with five strategic funding pillars, McGill has spent the last few years laying the groundwork for this tremendous undertaking.

As McGill embarks on the largest campaign in its history, on the eve of its third century, a carefully orchestrated and multi-constituent strategy has been implemented on all levels. Particular focus has been placed on strategies to:
• Actively engage three different generations of donors simultaneously
• Improve and customize donor recognition
• Leverage digital platforms to connect across time zones and borders
• Develop cross-disciplinary themes to attract donors with diverse interests
• Empower leaders from around the words to connect and advocate for their alma mater
Through a series of interactive exercises, participants may be surprised to learn that our challenges are actually the driving force of our success.

Speakers:

Amanda Fritz
Senior Philanthropy Officer, Primary Gifts, McGill University

Ms. Fritz is the Senior Philanthropy Officer, Primary Gifts for McGill University. In this role, she is responsible for identifying, cultivating and soliciting donations for strategic priorities across the university. She also participates in the planning of the upcoming bicentennial campaign, actively manages volunteers and staff, prepares cross-faculty funding proposals, and stewards donors at the University’s highest level.

Ms. Fritz joined McGill University’s advancement team in July 2008 as Donor Research and Development Assistant for the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital. From July 2010 she was responsible for The Neuro’s Annual Fund in the role of Development Officer, Leadership and Annual Giving, and in 2015 moved into the role of Development Officer, Major Gifts for The Neuro. In July 2017, she transitioned from a faculty-based role to McGill’s central development team as part of the Primary Gifts unit, whose focus is to secure $5M+ gifts for the University’s top initiatives.

Alexis Gaiptman
Associate Director – Major Gifts, Development, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital – McGill University
alexis.gaiptman@mcgill.ca

Alexis Gaiptman, CFRE is the Associate Director of Major Gifts, Development at Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (McGill University). She is a proven leader with over 12 years of fundraising experience in healthcare and has been leading planned giving programs since 2011. Her background is in Political Science, Women’s Studies and Community Economic Development. She is driven by her passion for growth, ability to embrace new challenges and desire to better our local communities. She is a Director on the board of AFP Quebec, volunteer with AFP GTA, AFP International as well as part of the Executive for the local Montreal CAGP Chapter.

Table 13: Case Statements, From Annual Funds to Capital Campaigns and Everything in Between

Track: Marketing and Communications

Speakers:

Erica Pettis
Managing Consultant, Graham-Pelton

Table 14: Leading with Learning

Track: Professional Development

There are many ways to develop your skills and expand your understanding of the advancement field, so many that it can sometimes be overwhelming.  Join me for conversation around how to best consider a plan for ongoing education and learning to help you achieve your next career step (at any level.)  We will share views on how to identify what you need to move up, how to discern between different opportunities, and what to do once you have gone through a program.

Speakers:

Jon Schaffrath
Program Director, Boston University

Jon’s career in nonprofit fundraising began in the Harvard Business School Development Office in 2006 as a staff assistant in the annual fund; he has been fundraising for HBS since then in a number of different positions across development, currently as a Senior Development Officer and Director of Regional Strategy. In 2009, Jon began as a part of a team teaching for Principles and Practices of Fundraising and Development Communications at the Harvard Extension School.  In 2011, Jon began as an Instructor at the Boston University Center for Professional Education teaching both the online and face‐to‐face fundraising courses; in 2017, he took on the role of Program Director.

Jon is a graduate of Boston College and has an MBA from Babson College with a Marketing concentration in addition to a number of fundraising credentials including: CASE Summer Institute and Boston University Certificate in Professional Fundraising.

Jonathan Schaffrath
JonSchaffrath@gmail.com

Table 15: First Time CASE DI Attendee Primer

Track: Professional Development

Speakers:

Jackie Nowell
Associate Vice President, Donor Relations and Engagement, University of Rhode Island
jnowell@uri.edu

Michelle Davis
Chief Marketing Officer, Wentworth Institute of Technology

Table 16: Glad to go Grad?:  Weighing the pros and cons of pursuing a Graduate Degree

Track: Professional Development

Speakers:

Kevin Fleming
Deputy Director of Alumnae Relations, Mount Holyoke College
kfleming@mtholyoke.edu

Table 18: Get Involved! How to Volunteer for CASE DI

Track: Professional Development

Led by the Conference volunteer chair and the District 1 volunteer chair, attendees will learn about opportunities for volunteering for CASE D1.  Join us to learn how important the volunteer role is in conjunction with the general planning and operation of the annual District Conference and the overall success of ongoing D1 programs throughout the year while building your professional network in advancement.

Speakers:

Princess Hyatt
Gift Processor, The Ethel Walker School
phyatt@my.ethelwalker.org

Michael Stenko
Director of Alumni Affairs, Eastern Connecticut State University

Table 19: Navigating your Career: How to Make the Most of the CASE D1 Network

Track: Professional Development

Speakers:

Nick Mancuso

Table 20: Let’s Talk: New to Educational Advancement Pre-con Discussion

Track: New to Educational Advancement

Speakers:

Table 21: Let’s Talk: Diversity and Inclusion Pre-con Discussion

Track: Diversity and Inclusion

Speakers:

Table 22: Let’s Talk: Women’s Leadeship Pre-con Discussion

Track: Women’s Leadership

Speakers:

Table 23: Let’s Talk: Volunteer Management

Track: Alumni Relations

Speakers:

Moana Bentin
Community Manager Affinity Groups, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
mbentin@mit.edu

Table: 24 Let’s Talk: Giving Days

Track: Development

Table 25: Let’s Talk: Student Philanthropy

Track: Development

Table 26: Let’s Talk: Independent Schools

Track: Independent Schools

Speakers:

Nicole Lonergan
Director of Engagement and Communications, Milton Academy
nicole_lonergan@milton.edu

Table 28: Let’s Talk: Marketing Challenges and Successes

Track: Marketing and Communications

Speakers:

Shawn Kornegay
Publicity and Marketing Administrator, Neag School of Education, University of Connecticut
shawn.kornegay@uconn.edu

Table 29: Let’s Talk: Small Shops

Track: Professional Development

Table 30: Let’s Talk: Community Colleges

Track: Professional Development

Speakers: